Monday , 23 October 2017

Is that the entrance or a black hole to another dimension? Norwegian cabin offers breathtaking Bergen views… but you have to crawl through an otherworldly tunnel to reach it

Perched atop Norway’s snowy Seven Mountains sits the stunning Tubakuba cabin.
But the off-the-grid property, made of glass and wood, isn’t just known for it’s sweeping views of the city of Bergen below.
In order to reach the small architectural marvel, guests are required to crawl through its tunnel-like entryway, which remarkably resembles an otherworldly black hole.

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High above the city of Bergen in Norway sits the Tubakuba cabin, which boasts a very unusual, vortex-like entryway

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Made up entirely of glass and wood, staying overnight in the cabin is free for families with young children

The interior is made of plywood, while the exterior is crafted from burnt larch that has been treated with a traditional Japanese method called Shou Sugi Ban to prevent fungal decay.
It’s the portal-like entrance that’s really something special, however, made up of curved shavings of pine and untreated larch, which will turn gray with time.

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The interior is made of plywood and has floor to ceiling windows along one side to allow guests to experience the breathtaking views

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There is no electricity and the cabin’s amenities are basic with only a wooden stove, bare wooden platforms and lofted sleeping space

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To reach the inside of the 14-square-metre cabin, everyone must crawl through the house’s ‘black hole’ tunnel entrance
Best of all, for families with young children, it’s free to stay overnight in the playful space.
The 14-square-metre cabin offers basic amenities, such as a wood stove, bare wooden platforms and a lofted sleeping area.
There’s no electricity, but the property is so small that it doesn’t require much heating.
And it’s the view that guests truly stop by for: large windows overlooking the rocky mountainside give visitors the impression that they are ‘floating’ above the valley below.

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Every detail of the tunnel was considered, right down to the the use of untreated larch wood, which will turn gray with time

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These drawings show exactly how the architecture students envisioned guests relaxing in the lofted sleeping spaces

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Referred to as a ‘wooden bubble,’ the property has since been nominated for a European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture

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Sketching was an important part of the students’ learning process and helped them identify structural problems and solutions

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The tuba-like tunnel is not just a way to reach the cabin’s interior, it’s also a play space in and of itself for children if the hut is closed